BIGGEST CAT IN THE WORLD Maine Coon – GIANT CAT BREED Maine Coon

Share it with your friends Like

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

Close
Pin It

My money on the Internet https://www.beonpush.com/s/maxbmwe53
BIGGEST CAT IN THE WORLD Maine Coon
GIANT CAT BREED Maine Coon

The Maine Coon is among the largest domesticated breeds of cats. It has a distinctive physical appearance and valuable hunting skills. It is one of the oldest natural breeds in North America, specifically native to the state of Maine,[2] where it is the official state cat.

Although no records exist regarding the Maine Coon’s exact origins and date of introduction to the United States, there are multiple competing theories. The breed was popular in cat shows in the late 19th century, but its existence became threatened when long-haired breeds from overseas were introduced in the early 20th century. The Maine Coon has since made a comeback and is now one of the most popular cat breeds in the world.

The Maine Coon is a large and sociable cat, hence its nickname, “the gentle giant”. It is characterized by a robust bone structure, rectangular body shape, a silky flowing coat and a long, bushy tail. The breed’s colors vary widely, with only lilac and chocolate disallowed for pedigree. Reputed for its intelligence and playful, gentle personality, the Maine Coon is often cited as having “dog-like” characteristics.[3][4] Professionals notice certain health problems in the breed including feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hip dysplasia, but reputable breeders use modern screening methods to minimize the frequency of these problems.

Breed description[edit]

Sitting, relaxed and confident. Note the wolf-style tail and paws like hand-paddles
Maine Coons are the largest breed of domestic cat. Males weigh from 13 to 18 lb (5.9 to 8.2 kg) with females weighing from 8 to 12 lb (3.6 to 5.4 kg).[18] The height of adults can vary between 10 and 16 in (25 and 41 cm) and they can reach a length of up to 48 in (120 cm), including the tail, which can reach a length of 14 in (36 cm)[19] and is long, tapering, and heavily furred, almost resembling a raccoon’s tail. The body is solid and muscular, which is necessary for supporting their own weight, and the chest is broad. Maine Coons possess a rectangular body shape and are slow to physically mature; their full potential size is normally not reached until they are three to five years old, while other cats take about one year.[20]

In 2010, the Guinness World Records accepted a male purebred Maine Coon named “Stewie” as the “Longest Cat” measuring 48.5 in (123 cm) from the tip of his nose to the tip of his tail. Stewie died February 4, 2013, from cancer at his home in Reno, Nevada, at age 8.[21][22] Large Maine coons can overlap in length with Eurasian lynxes, although with a much lighter build and lower height.[23]

The Maine Coon is a longhaired, or medium-haired, cat. The coat is soft and silky, although texture may vary with coat color. The length is shorter on the head and shoulders, and longer on the stomach and flanks with some cats having a lion-like ruff around their neck. Minimal grooming is required for the breed, compared to other long-haired breeds, as their coat is mostly self-maintaining owing to a light-density undercoat. The coat is subject to seasonal variation,[24] with the fur being thicker in the winter and thinner during the summer.

Maine Coons can have any colors that other cats have. Colors indicating crossbreeding, such as chocolate, lavender, the Siamese pointed patterns or the “ticked” patterns, are not accepted by some breed standards (the ‘ticked’ pattern, for example, is accepted by TICA).[7] The most common pattern seen in the breed is brown tabby.[25] All eye colors are accepted under breed standards, with the exception of the occurrence of blue-colored or odd-eyes (i.e. two eyes of different colors) in cats possessing coat colors other than white.[24]

Maine Coons have several physical adaptations for survival in harsh winter climates. Their dense water-resistant fur is longer and shaggier on their underside and rear for extra protection when they are walking or sitting on top of wet surfaces of snow or ice.[26] Their long and bushy raccoon-like tail is resistant to sinking in snow, and can be curled around their face and shoulders for warmth and protection from wind and blowing snow and it can even be curled around their backside like an insulated seat cushion when sitting down on a snow or ice surface.[27] Large paws, and especially the extra-large paws of polydactyl Maine Coons,[28] facilitate walking on snow and are often compared to snowshoes.[26] Long tufts of fur growing between their toes help keep the toes warm and further aid walking on snow by giving the paws additional structure without significant extra weight.[27] Heavily furred ears with extra long tufts of fur growing from inside help keep their ears warm.

Comments

Write a comment