Maine Coon Cat VS. Ragdoll Cat

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Maine Coon Cat VS. Ragdoll Cat.

What are the differences between these two cat breeds?

The Maine Coon is a native New Englander, hailing from Maine, where they were popular mousers, farm cats, and–most likely–ship’s cats, at least as far back as the early 19th century. The first thing you’ll probably notice is that Maine Coons are big–really big. In fact, the record for the world’s longest house cat belongs to a Maine Coon who grew to be over four feet long. But these kitties have more going for them than size. They’re affectionate without being needy, they’re adaptable, and they’ve kept their hunting instincts, just in case you need a good mouser. If you can handle a whole lot of cats, this kitty might be a perfect addition to your family.

The good-natured and affable Maine Coon adapts well to many lifestyles and personalities. They like being with people and have the habit of following them around, but they aren’t needy. They’re happy to receive attention when you direct it their way, but if you’re busy, they’re satisfied to just supervise your doings. Close a door on them and they will wait patiently for you to realize the error of your ways and let them in. They’re not typically a lap cat, but they do like to be near you.

They also retain their skill as a mouser. No rodents will be safe in a home where a Maine Coon resides. Even if you don’t have any mice for them to chase, they’ll keep their skills sharp by chasing toys and grabbing them with their big paws. A Maine Coon also enjoys playing fetch and will retrieve small balls, toys, or wadded-up pieces of paper. They can climb as well as any cat but usually prefer to stay on the ground level.

They love their human families, even children, and will get along with other pets fairly well. Docile, sweet, and happy to relax for a good cuddle session. If you’re looking for a companion, you can’t find a much better choice than one of these easygoing felines.

Unlike many cats, Ragdolls are notable for collapsing into the arms of anyone who holds them, even if they are cradled on their back. They love their people, greeting them at the door, following them around the house, and leaping into a lap or snuggling in bed whenever given the chance. They often learn to come when called or to retrieve toys that are thrown for them. The word most often used to describe them is docile, but that doesn’t mean they are inactive. They like to play with toys and enter into any family activities.

With positive reinforcement in the form of praise and food rewards when they do something you like, Ragdolls learn quickly and can pick up tricks as well as good behaviors such as using a scratching post. In a small, sweet voice, they remind you of mealtime or ask for petting but are not excessively vocal. Ragdolls have nice manners and are easy to live with. You will find a Ragdoll on your sofa or bed, but generally not much higher than that. He prefers to stay on the same level with his people rather than the highest point in a room.

Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they eat almost exclusively meat. Their diet should consist of no more than 5% carbohydrates and most of their protein should come from an animal source.

Another important consideration is your cat’s water intake. Cats in the wild get most of their hydration from their diet, not by actually drinking water as most people think. Canned cat food is about 70-80% water, while dry food is only about 10% water. Although you can make up some of the water loss by providing a bowl or fountain of water, it’s still not usually enough to cover the difference.

If your cat is healthy and doesn’t have special dietary requirements, then mainly wet food with dry food being supplementary and raw food being optional will likely be fine. Unless your cat has an exceptional ability to self-regulate its eating, it’s not a good idea to leave out unlimited food all day, especially dry food. It’s okay to leave dry or wet food out all day if you use measured portions that make sense for your cat’s weight and activity level.

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